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Athletic Performance Enhancement that is Legal, Ethical, and Healthy.

Tag Archives: recovery

ASEA Athlete ~ Josh Horowitz

Josh Horowitz is a professional cyclist and coach.  Josh uses ASEA to gain a competitive edge and has seen substantial results in his personal training and improvements in his race times.

Here is the transcript of the video viewed above.

“My name is Josh Horowitz I am the director of the Adageo Energy pro cycling team I am also a racer on the team and I am a coach.

Bike racing is a tough sport. Sometimes you train 25, 30, even 35 hours a week. Races can last two, three, four days even a week. If you can come back stronger each day instead of getting more and more fatigued it is going to be a big part of your ability to succeed in the sport. ASEA has become a big part of that for me. I have found that I can train back to back days and do races multiple days in a row and still feel strong and even actually feel stronger from day to day.

I take my training very seriously. It is all very calculated, it is all very scheduled down to the minute. I notice with the ASEA, using my power meter which gives me a very objective quantification of how strong I am riding, I have noticed when I am on ASEA I can sustain my power outputs for much longer periods of time. I can do more intervals in a row without having to rest. When it comes to race day that’s really a lot of the success is due to the ability to maintain a strong power output all the way through the end of the race. At the end of the day when you cross the finish line that you have a little bit more left in the tank then the rest of the riders, that can be the difference between a top placing and a pack finish.

I use ASEA in my preparation for the Philadelphia international championships. Which was a big objective for me for my entire cycling career. I used it pretty regularly for about a month leading up to the race. I did some heavy training, and my training was the best training I think I have ever had in my 23 year cycling career.

When it came to race day I felt amazing! It was the longest race I have ever done 156 miles. I felt better as each lap went by. I noticed the other riders starting to fatigue I noticed the other riders were dropping out. When I got off the bike at the end I felt pretty much fresh and it was a pretty incredible feeling.”

See how other Athletes are using ASEA.

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Redox Signaling Powers Up Aerobic Performance

As the energy requirements of the cells and tissues increase during aerobic activity, oxygen and sugars in the blood must be able to be transferred from the lungs and energy stores into the muscle cells and tissues. Waste products like CO2 and excess lactates must be transferred out of the cells and tissues and back into the blood and out of the body. The efficiency at which the cells can move oxgen fuel and waste products back and forth through the blood and cellular membranes determines how long the body can sustain aerobic activity.

When the oxygen and energy demands of the muscle tissues exceed the ability of the body to maintain adequate delivery, the muscle cells and tissues start to burn internal energy stores anaerobically (without the use of oxygen), waste products (CO2 and lactates) start to build up and further interfere with the aerobic processes. When the internal energy stores of the muscle cells are exhausted, no more energy can be provided and muscle activity ceases completely.

Increasing the amount of balanced redox signaling molecules in the body helps normalize the redox potential in and around the cells and tissues. A balanced redox potential in the tissues increases the efficiency at which oxygen, fuels and wastes can be transferred in and out of cells and tissues, making the natural aerobic processes more efficient. If aerobic capacities are increased, then the natural length of time that aerobic activity can be sustained under high energy demands is also increased. The time that it takes to recover normal aerobic balance after an intense anaerobic effort is also shortened.

ASEA Athlete Sets Ironman 70.3 Record!

Ironman 70.3 World Record HolderAt the beginning of 2010, James Lawrence had a goal: to break the world record of number of Half Ironman Triathlons (called “Ironman 70.3” in the athletic world) in one year. When he contacted the Guiness World Record folks, they informed him that the old record was 16, but that to be extra sure, they would only accept a new record of 20 or higher.

To understand what that means, consider this: an Ironman 70.3 consists of a 1.2-mile swim, followed by a 56-mile bike ride, followed by a 13.1-mile run. To complete 20 of these in a year would mean that James would have to finish one every two and a half weeks!

So did James break the old record and hit the magic number of 20? No! He actually completed 22 Ironman 70.3 races! And he did it in just 30 weeks, meaning he averaged one race every nine and a half days!

And what role did ASEA play in helping James shatter the old record? “ASEA was definitely instrumental in my recovery,” he says, “giving me every advantage I needed to break this record. I was scared to go off it while attempting this quest!”

James capped his amazing new record by competing in the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Clearwater, Florida in November.

The Cycling World is getting turned on to ASEA.

The dominoes are beginning to fall as the word about Asea and what it is doing for athletes spreads.  The cycling world seems to have taken the lead in adopting this product.  Cyclists at all competitive levels are seeing dramatic increases in their endurance, performance, recovery, and most importantly their race times!

Richard Cunningham, Technical Editor for Road Bike Action Magazine recently agreed to conduct his own independent, unpaid review of ASEA with the conditions that if his results were not favorable he would publish those results. The independent ASEA associate who asked Richard to try it out didn’t flinch. If you are a subscriber to Road Bike Action Magazine your copy of Richard’s review is in the current issue. Please head over to your nearest news stand and get a copy of the July issue of Road Bike Action Magazine and patronize them for the full article.   Or click Road Bike Action July 2010 to download the article.

Here are some excerpts:

“So, the ASEA folks spent some bucks for some independent tests on endurance athletes and discovered that athletes, on average, could push 10 percent longer at their maximum thresholds with high results in the 30-percent range and lows around 7 percent. After testing this stuff for three months, I’d have to agree with them. We could pedal harder and longer and recover from repeated, 100-percent efforts in ridiculously short intervals. The word “recovery” is the operate in the ASEA equation”

“Initially, people drink 6 ounces and wait for some chemical “kick,” like how a super-caffeinated coke hits you when you are on the ropes. Instead, ASEA quietly powers up the muscles, dramatically reducing recovery time after over-the-top efforts, and it enables you to push precariously close to the anaerobic threshold for prolonged periods of time. Typically, a cyclist can recover from three, perhaps four all-out efforts over the course of an event. Any more than that, and the athlete’s overall performance will be cut short and every subsequent effort will be painful. Typically, ASEA users can go hard over and over again and count on a full recovery within a few minutes. In addition, it is possible to push harder on the pedals for extended periods without going anaerobic. Most climbs can be ridden at least on gear higher, with some users busting out climbs in the next larger chainring.”

“ASEA doesn’t seem to improve your peak strength. If you can’t get over a particular hill in your big chainring today, six gulps of ASEA won’t power you over the mountain tomorrow. You still have to train to get stronger. ASEA will help you maintain your existing strength over a longer period of time. For Instance: if you could push the middle chainring up a 16-percent grade during the first 30 minutes of a ride, two hours later-when most riders would be clicking into the granny gear before a big climb-you could probably repeat that performance”

Another respected and highly regarded online cycling publication recently reviewed Asea for its readers.  Bicycle.net editor Jonathan Tessler did a similar test and review of Asea with similarly glowing remarks.  You can see the review in its entirety by CLICKING HERE.  Or you can download a transcript here.

It’s important to note these comments are an independent review of well respected magazine and website editors who were not compensated for the tests. We owe a debt of thanks to Mr. Cunningham and the editors of Bicycle.net for lending increased credibility to the Asea story and everything we’ve been telling you about on this blog.

If you are an Athlete and you are not paying attention to ASEA you are putting yourself at a competitive disadvantage when you go up against those who are using this product!

If you are an entrepreneur and you have not been introduced to ASEA as a business opportunity, may we respectfully encourage you to investigate.  The timing could not be better.

Asea is a name you are going to keep hearing about.  Don’t wait until its become common knowledge to look into it.  Do it while its still a relative unknown and be among the first to reap the benefits.

For more information or to contact us CLICK HERE.

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